• EMS

    The department has been rendering Emergency services using an old fleet, with more than 60% of the fleet having travelled more than 200 000 km.

    However, in 2014/15, in response to the Premier’s budget speech, as well as the Speech of the MEC of Health, the department has succeeded in procuring 50 new Ambulances. 23 are already operational, and the remaining 27 ambulances are being registered for operationalization. All the new vehicles are fitted with new equipment. Further, the department is planning on procurement of 100 more Ambulances in 2015/16.

    In implementing the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s 4, 5 & 6) as well as CARMMA strategy, all aimed at reducing both maternal and Infant mortality, EMS has developed a fully-fledged Obstetric service, with a dedicated co-ordinator. The department has received a donation of 1 Obstetric Ambulance from The People of the Republic of Turkey, in October 2014. In addition, the department has been allocated a budget by NDOH, and has commenced process of procurement of 5 additional Obstetric ambulances for the 2014/15 FY.

    In addition, the department has trained 30 personnel (ILS category) on ESMOE. This will be an additional cadre of health Professionals who will work under the Supervision and support of Paramedics (Advanced Life Support). This training is ongoing.

    The department has secured and utilizes the Aeromedical services on contract. Currently there is only 1 chopper that is operational province wide. Most of the patients transported are maternal and child category, in addition to accident patients, who need emergency transport at the shortest period to save lives.

    Rescue services are another component of EMS. In cases of floods and other disasters, a team of trained Paramedics and EMS Practitioners are dispatched to the rescue missions, and a sterling work has been done over a long time by the dedicated staff in EMS.

  • Nursing Training

    The Limpopo College of Nursing in association with the University of Limpopo is nurse training institution under the Department of Health and Social Development.

    The College was established in terms of the Northern Province College of Nursing act, Act No 3 of 1996. It was established by the amalgamation of the former Gazankulu College of Nursing, Groothoek Nursing College and Venda Nursing College. The College consists of a head office and at a present three campuses, namely: Sovenga Campus, Giyani Campus and Thohoyandou Campus.

    The College offers basic and post basic programmes at its campuses, in association with the University of Limpopo.

    The four year basic diploma program is presented in accordance with the South African Nursing Council (SANC) Regulation R425. On completion of the course the candidate will obtain a diploma endorsed by the University of asssociation which allows dor registration with SANC as a Professional Nurse (General, Psychiatric and Community) and Midwifery.

    Vision

    Centre of excellence for nurse training and education.

    Mission

    The College is committed to facilitate community and outcome based, quality, scientific nursing education and training that is sensitive to human rights in a multi-sectoral environment.

    Programmes offered

    1. Diploma in nursing (General, Psychiatric & Community) and Midwifery
    2. Post Basic Programme
    Information for Alumni
  • Nursing Services

    The Nursing services Directorate was established in July 2001 with the aim of improving the quality of care. Its sub-programmes include nursing practice, professionalism and nursing management.

    Nursing practice

    It ensures quality nursing care through the development of policies, guidelines and standardized operational procedures for nursing practice, development of action plans in line with service delivery needs and resources, linkage of theory and research to practice as well as assurance of better improved quality of supervision. It includes the establishment of quality nursing teams and facilitation of peer reviews at facility, local area, district and inter-district level. Monitoring and Support visits to facilities are conducted to support nurses.

    Professionalism

    It deals with the restoration, promotion and maintenance of professionalism and a caring ethos through moral regeneration events; ensures compliance to professional registration, scope of practice and the enhancement of the corporate image. Annually Limpopo nurses take part in the International Nurses’ Day celebrations.

    Nursing management

    It provides and promotes support to nurse managers. This is realized through professional and Leadership Development programmes, management and career development in accordance with health service delivery needs, exposure programmes, mentorship and coaching programmes, recognition and reward for outstanding performance. Peer reviews are conducted and best practices shared during district and provincial nurse managers’ forums. Community service programme for nursing personnel is implemented.

    Nursing Areas

    Nursing is provided in all health facilities with nurses working in hospitals (general and specialized nursing) and in Primary Health Care facilities. Nurses are involved in different programmes inter-alia, Public Health programmes, Tuberculosis Control, HIV and AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Integrated Primary health care, Maternal, Child and Women’s health programmes and Nursing Education.

    Staff members
    Rachel Chuenyane Mamaila Ruth Kgasu Elizabeth Mmalehu Legodi
    Contact us
    James Rakoma +27 (0)15 293 6208 0867644844 : James.Rakoma@dhsd.limpopo.gov.za
  • NHI

    South Africa is undertaking a major health financing reform trajectory. A National Health Insurance (NHI) is the vehicle which is intended to bring about the desired health reforms and is expected to have a significant impact on the health of all South Africans. The Green Paper on NHI described the policy objective of NHI as to ‘ensure that everyone has access to appropriate, efficient and quality health services’. Intended to be phased in over a period of 14 years, such a system will require significant overhaul of existing service delivery structures, administrative and management systems.

    In summary, the NHI will improve access to quality healthcare services and provide financial risk protection against health-related catastrophic expenditures for the whole Population as required by the World Health Organisation’s Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Such a system will provide a mechanism for improving cross-subsidisation, according to which funding contributions would be linked to an individual’s ability to pay and benefits from health services would be in line with an individual’s needs. Everyone will have access to a comprehensive package of healthcare services, provided through accredited and contracted public and private providers, with a strong focus on health promotion and prevention services at the community and household level. There will be clear lines of accountability at all levels of the health service and transparency of decision making.

    Since the NHI Green Paper was launched in August 2011 there has been considerable progress in preparing the final NHI policy and in preparing South Africa’s health system for the introduction of NHI. At national level, progress has been registered against key features of the NHI’s development as outlined in the Green Paper and includes inputs on key areas and initiatives that have been identified for the successful implementation of NHI. This includes, amongst others, management reforms, hospital reimbursement reforms, establishment of the Office for Health Standards Compliance, undertaking of the national health facility audit, quality improvement and certification, and strengthening of district health authorities. At provincial level, NHI pilot districts are implementing various health systems strengthening innovations to prepare for the full introduction of the NHI beyond the first five years of the pilot phase. In Vhembe progress has been recorded on the following key NHI deliverables between 2012/13 and 2013/14 financial years: Governance and coordination: the Executive Management approved the Provincial Governance & Coordination Framework. There are coordination structures at provincial and district level to ensure coordinated planning and implantation, including stakeholder participation.

    The NHI Conditional Grant has contributed significantly to progress in NHI implementation, principally through staff training, provision of equipment, and refurbishment of health facilities. Over 100 PHC facilities have received new basic medical equipment while over 100 facilities managers and health managers have received training in key areas of supply chain management, health planning and health information management.

    Bench-marking Visits to other provinces and lessons learnt:

    • NW: learnt about comprehensive response to the Burden of Disease.
    • KZN: have shared experiences on ‘War Room’ approaches to managing Ward based Outreach Teams (WBOTs);
    • Western Cape: learnt about use of Family Physicians to serve as custodians of Clinical Governance for decentralised District Services to improve the quality of care.
    • Placement of Public Health Medicine Registrars to rotate in Vhembe District: Registrar doctors provide technical support required for district profiling, rational district health planning, monitoring and evaluation and health programmes management support efforts.

      NHI Communication strategy: Municipal–based Road-shows were implemented under the leadership of the MEC to improve stakeholder NHI awareness. Lessons learnt from this activity is that it should be undertaken annually at scale in all municipalities;

      Notable progress has been made on PHC Re-engineering streams. Integrated School Health services are being accelerated as more school health teams are being established to provide key school health services at various schools to ensure prevention, early detection of childhood illnesses and appropriate referral to health facilities where necessary. A District –based Clinical Specialist Team has been established to develop discipline-specific service delivery guidelines and protocols, district profiling and implementation of targeted training in key areas of promotion and prevention, reduction of child and maternal mortalities and morbidity. An option of recruiting retired registered specialists is being considered to address the challenge of scarce specialties such as paediatrics as well as obstetrics and genecology. 85 functional Municipal-based Outreach Teams have been established and these teams have made progress in household profiling, disease prevention and referrals to PHC facilities. To date, Vhembe District has recruited and contracted over ten General Practitioners (GPs) to improve doctor-coverage at key rural PHC facilities. National health is busy addressing the challenge of private provider reimbursement system to unlock barriers to scaling up of GP contracting efforts.

      Field-testing of a referral system: a service provider has been appointed to field-test the Referral Communication System with the aim of proving access to telephone communication between Community-based Health Workers, PHC Nurses and designated referral doctors at district hospitals to ensure a seamless continuity of care for clients between tiers of the healthcare delivery platform.

      A District Central Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) project has been established. The principal purpose of this project is to decongest PHC facilities by establishing decentralised medicines pick-up points to enable stable chronic clients to collect medicines closer to their homes. To date, 15 010 clients have been enrolled and a plan is underway to expand these services to also cover non-communicable chronic diseases of lifestyles and rolling out the project to other health districts.

      Performance against key Health Indicators: Based on the National Health Indicator Dashboard, Vhembe District ranks top in the province and number 5 nationally after the top four leading health districts in Western Cape.

      Partnerships: the district has a strong partnership with the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD). This bilateral collaboration provides key health professionals to the ARV Programme, technical support to the District NHI Coordination Office as well as health information management, monitoring and evaluation initiatives. While the above represent a significant progress in the implementation of NHI, however, barriers and challenges exist. These include huge health system strengthening challenges e.g. infrastructure backlogs, health information management deficiencies, essential health technologies, health workforce needs at various levels of the system, supply chain management practices and general system’s capacities to provide high quality services. There are multi-pronged interventions to address these challenges and an attempt will be made to chronicle key ones in the next edition of the newsletter. There are also stakeholder ‘perceptions’ about what NHI is and ought to be providing. It need to be noted that funding for the general health infrastructure is funded the relevant conditional grants streams outside the NHI Conditional Grant funding arrangements. Equally, essential medical equipment, health workforce needs and Health Information Management are funded from the Equitable Share funding i.e. the main health budget vote. At the recent Communications Strategic Planning session, the District and its partners recognised the centrality of comprehensive communications strategies to continually address targeted community awareness issues, general needs for information dissemination efforts and stakeholder participation in all NHI initiatives and the broader provision of healthcare to the population.

  • Pharmaceutical
    PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICES

    Pharmaceutical services are provided through the Provincial Depot and Pharmacies in our health facilities. Key Leadership posts have been filled at Provincial Pharmaceutical and District, except in 1 District (Sekhukhune, recently vacated).

    The depot is the supplier of medicines and Surgical sundries for most of the health facilities, except for those that have now been rolled out for Direct Deliveries and Direct Procurement. The facility is also accredited in 2014 for training of Pharmacist Assistants, which is one of major breakthroughs.

    Stock availability, a key strategic objective for Pharmaceutical services, has improved quite significantly over the past 2 years. The following depicts the vast improvement at the different levels of care:

    Performance Indicator (Percentage availability of essential medicines) Actual Achievement 2012/13 Planned target 2013/14 Actual achievement 2013/14
    Depot 59.01% 95% 71.71%
    Hospitals 79.68% 95% 84.50%
    Clinics 72.75% 92% 82.7%

    Challenges are continuously being addressed to improve stock availability at ll levels, per service package

    The department commenced the process of Direct Deliveries (DDV’s) for ARV’s and Oncology medicines in 2012, for all facilities. The aim of the DDV’s is to improve stock availability at facilities, by placing orders central, and getting deliveries directly to facilities. This cuts out the logistics and challenges faced with receiving medicines through the depot.

    In response to the Minister’s directive on implementation of DDV’s in Central and Tertiary hospitals, Pietersburg and Mankweng Hospitals commenced with Direct Procurement of Medical and Surgical items in November 2013. Further, in response to the directives by the MEC’s, the department commenced rollout of DDV’s, starting at 4 Regional hospitals (Letaba, Mokopane, St. Ritas and Philadelphia), with effect from September 2014. There is a plan to continue with the roll-out to other facilities, once systems are in place.

    At the end of 2013, the department entered into an agreement with Management Sciences For Health (MSH), for provision of an electronic stock management system to be installed in all facilities, including the depot. The aim was to have a system that can operated, that would assist to identify challenges in stock management at facilities, at the press of a button. The Rx solution was hence rolled out in 2014. Up to date, 7 hospitals are live on the Rx solution. These include: Pietersburg, Mankweng, Bela-bela, Ellisrus, George Masebe, FH Odendaal, Mokopane. The following Development partners, in addition to MSH, has also come on board, to provide support ( technical training or procurement of equipment).

    Rollout of the Rx solution is progressing to other facilities, as per plan and availability of technical support.

  • Nutrition
  • MCHWN

    The Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services (AYFS) is a strategy that addresses the health needs and challenges of the young people especially at the Primary Health Care facilities. The strategy encourages young people to access the services provided at the Primary Health Care facilities and also capacitate the Health Professionals on positive attitude towards Adolescents and Youth. AYFS aim at reducing Youth Risky Behaviours like teenage pregnancy; substance abuse, STI; HIV and AIDS etc.

    Limpopo is one of the provinces with high rate of teenage pregnancy. In 2012/13 were 7.8 and in 2013/14 were 7.9. One of the strategies to address this challenge is implementation of Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services.

    There are 117 Primary Health Care facilities implementing Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services in Limpopo. There are trained young people (Peer Educators) placed in some of the clinics to assist the Adolescent and the Youth visiting the clinics.

    The following information is given to the Adolescent and the Youth visiting the PHC facilities among others:

    • Know your body.
    • Rights and Responsibilities for the Adolescent and the Youth
    • Benefits of abstinence
    • Information on HIV and AIDS
    • Medical Male Circumcision
    • Contraception

    INTEGRATED SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAMME (ISHP)

    ISHP is a more comprehensive package of services, which addresses not only barriers to learning, but also other conditions which contribute to morbidity and mortality amongst learners during both childhood and adulthood. It involves provision of services to learners in Quintile 1 and Quintile 2 schools; in all educational phases (foundation (Grades R-3); intermediate (Grades 4-6); senior (Grades 7-9); and Further Education and Training (FET) (Grades 10-12).

    TARGET LEARNERS IN QUINTILE 1 AND QUINTILE 2 SCHOOLS FOR ASSESSMENT:
    • Grade R
    • Grade 1
    • Grade 4
    • Grade 8
    • Grade 10

    All learners repeating grades Learners from other grades can be assessed if the educator; parent or self-referred to the school health nurse. Health promotion – All learners are given health promotion according to their age cohort.

    SERVICES RENDERED DURING THE SCREENING AMONGST OTHERS
    • Vision
    • Hearing
    • Oral health
    • Height and weight
    • Nutritional assessment
    • Fine and motor assessment
    • Psychosocial services
    • Immunization
    HOW THE PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN SHOULD ASSIST:

    The parent or legal guardian should sign the consent form for the learner to be screened. If the consent form is not signed; the learner will not be screened or will not receive the service. It is the responsibility of the parent or legal guardian to take the referred learner to the clinic or referred institution. It is important for the parent or legal guardian to write on the consent form if the learner has any allergy to any medication or to write anything that will assist the nurse during the screening,

    Manager Youth and Adolescent services

    Mrs Alice Nkoana
    015 293 6042

    Integrated Management of Childhood illness (IMCI)

    IMCI is an intervention strategy designed by the World Health Organisation and UNICEF to address common childhood illness namely Pneumonia Diarrhoea, Malnutrition, Malaria and HIV/ AIDS. The strategy offers a set of intervention that promote rapid recognition and effective treatment of common childhood illness in children less than 5 years of age.

    All Primary Health care facilities are implementing IMCI
    What communities should know about the care of Children?

    1. Feeding your baby
    Breastfeed the baby( only breast milk) for the first 6 months of life, Breastfeed whenever the baby wants at least 8 times in 24 hours
    At 6 months, start feeding the child freshly prepared nutritious food that is available at home and continue to breastfeed until the child is at least 2 years old.
    2 years and older- feed 5 times a day, Give family foods 3 meals each day, twice daily give nutritious snacks between meals such as bread with peanut butter or margarine, Fresh fruit and full cream milk.
    Feed using a spoon and plate

    2. Vitamins and Minerals
    Give your child foods which are rich in Vitamin A, iron and iodine. These foods include pawpaw, mangoes, Peaches, apricot, Pumpkin, Butternut, carrot and green leafy vegetables like spinach. Fish, meat, Chicken and chicken liver.

    3. Baby’s development
    Mothers and fathers spend time with your child, talking, listening, playing and showing your child love. This will help your child to grow properly.
    Take your child for growth monitoring and promotion to detect growth faltering
    Provide ways for the child to see, feel and move
    Have large colourful things for your child to reach for, and new things to see
    Give your child safe household things to handle, bang and drop
    Give your child things to stack up, and put into containers and take out
    Help your child count, name and compare things, Make simple toys for your child

    4. Water and sanitation
    Dispose faeces safely
    Wash hands with water and soap after changing children’s nappies, before preparing meals, and before feeding children
    Ensure that clean water is used for drinking
    Take your child to the clinic for deworming every 6 months, starting at 12 months of age

    5. Malaria
    Know the signs of malaria in children: Fever, fast breathing, headache and sweating and take child to the clinic
    Allow indoor insecticides house spraying

    6. Child Abuse
    Watch over and protect children from abuse and neglect, and give them loving care so that they can grow and develop well
    When the child has been abused take urgent steps to comfort and take the child to the nearest clinic

    7. Accident at Home
    Watch over children carefully to make sure they do not get hurt
    Keep potentially dangerous items out of reach of children
    Young children should be kept away from dangerous areas
    If the child is injured take the child to the nearest clinic as soon as possible

    8. HIV/AIDS
    Prevention of HIV in children is best achieved by prevention of infection in men and women. For the sake of your baby know your status and practice safe sex at all times
    Children need constant supervision and protection from abuse
    Children need to be well nourished
    Orphans and vulnerable children whose parents are ill need particular care, love, education, shelter and support from families, communities and health workers
    Antiretroviral must be taken correctly every day

    9. Birth registration
    Make sure that you register the birth of your child within the first month of life
    10. Home care for sick children
    Continue to feed the child when sick
    If the child is breastfed, breastfeed more often
    If the child is not breastfed, increase fluids in small amounts
    Diarrhoea
    If the child has diarrhoea give sugar- salt solution. (SSS) also known as Motswako
    Give the SSS after every loose stool – under 2 years give half a cup, 2 years to 5 years give 1 cup
    If the child vomits, wait 10 minutes then continue, but more slowly
    Continue giving SSS until the diarrhoea stops
    If the child is being breastfed continue to breastfeed frequently and for longer
    Take the child to the clinic for ZINC and assessment

    10. Children must be taken urgently to the nearest clinic when any of these danger signs occur
    Child unable to drink or breastfeed
    Child Vomits everything
    Convulsions
    Child lethargic or unconscious

    11. After you have been to the clinic
    Give the child the full course of medicine even when the child appear to be getting better
    Children who are taking Antiretroviral for HIV or anti TB treatment must take every tablet or medicine as prescribed even if they are feeling better
    Go back for follow up at the clinic as discussed with the health worker if the child is getting sicker or even if the child appears to be getting better
    Go back to the same clinic or Doctor if the child is not getting better
    Take your child to the hospital if the health worker asks you to do so
    Remember always to take the Road To Health Booklet with you when visiting the clinic or hospital

    12. Immunisation
    Take your child for a full course of immunisation according to the time table marked on the Road to Health Booklet

    H.B. Mlati
    Manager Child Health
    Office 141
    Tel: 0152936097
    Email: Beatrice. Mlati@dhsd.limpopo.gov.za

    Promotes positive pregnancy outcomes- a healthy mother and a healthy baby through.

    ANTENATAL CARE

    Carefully identifying risk factors, diagnosing complications early, managing the complications and providing health education for mothers and their unborn babies to remain healthy.

    This is best achieved when mothers book early for antenatal care, preferably as soon as a menstrual period is missed-(within first 3 months of pregnancy- confirmed through pregnancy test)

    CLEAN AND SAFE DELIVERY

    Best ensured by skilled health professionals when monitoring labour, performing deliveries and during postnatal care

    ESSENTIAL OBSTETRIC CARE

    That ensure care is provided for high risk pregnancies and complications during antenatal period, labour, delivery and postnatal care

    MOM CONNECT PROGRAMME

    Pregnant mothers enjoy the privilege of being registered on the programme and receive supportive messages throughout pregnancy and after delivery.

    Mothers are encouraged to breastfeed their babies exclusively for six months while actively involved in spacing and timing for the next pregnancy through prevention using Family planning methods while supported by their partners.

    MATERNAL DEATH NOTIFICATION

    Should a woman lose her life while pregnant or within 42 days after delivery. The department must be notified.

    ENJOY SERVICES PROVIDED BY HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN MATERNAL HEALTH! CHILDREN ARE THE FURTURE!!

    Manager Maternal Health

    Moshabela M.E
    0732324352

    Department of Health’s vision is that every woman shall have access to Sexual and Reproductive health services

    Programme objective – is geared towards improving health status and quality of life of women and girl children through increasing access to their reproductive health rights.

    Services that contribute to the health of women

    1. Family Planning services/Contraception services
    In simple term Family planning is birth control or fertility control

    Objectives

    • To reduce/prevent unwanted or unplanned pregnancies.
    • Child spacing (number of years between pregnancies)
    • Mothers are able to decide how many children they want

    Methods of Family Planning/contraceptives available from public facilities
    Female and male condoms
    Pill/ oral contraceptives
    Injectable ( Nuristrate or Petogen)
    Sub dermal contraceptive implant (Implanon)
    Loop/ IUCD ( intra uterine contraceptive device)
    Female sterilization ( Tubal Ligation)
    Male sterilization ( Vasectomy)
    Emergency contraception (morning after pill or IUCD) for women who had unexpected unprotected sex within 5 days of the sexual relationship – BUT remember you should also need to check for STI and HIV.

    THE EMPHASIS IS ON DUAL PROTECTION

    2. Cervical cancer screening services

    Objectives:

    • To reduce the incidence of invasive cancer of the cervix.
      by early detection and treatment before the cancer can spreads to the rest of
      the body.
    • Reducing the number of deaths associated with cervical cancer.

    Every woman from the age 30 years and older should be screened for cervical cancer using a Pap smear test.
    Pap smear test is available in all health facilities for screening of cancer of the cervix for free.

    3. Breast cancer screening

    Objectives

    The objective is to create awareness amongst the general population.
    Provision of women with skills of Breast Self-Examination
    Encourage women to seek professional help as soon as abnormalities are detected

    NB: Breast abnormalities to be reported:

    • Lump thickening in the breast or armpit
    • Unusual increase in the size of one breast
    • Persistent discharges such as blood or pus
    • Scaly patches on the breast or nipple skin
    • Development of dimple on the breast

    4. Safe Termination of Pregnancy

    Termination of Pregnancy Act (Act No. 92 of 1996 as amended) gives women the right to choose whether they want to continue with their pregnancy or not.

    Objectives
    To reduce maternal deaths caused by illegal unsafe abortion.
    To provide accessible, efficient, user friendly safe termination of pregnancy.

    NB: TERMINATION OF PREGNANCY IS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE USED AS A FAMILY PLANNING METHOD AS THIS CAN BE DANGEROUS TO THE BODY OF A WOMAN IN HER LIFESPAN.

    Designated facilities providing safe termination of pregnancy for women up to 12 weeks of pregnancy as follows:

    Capricorn district
    1. Helena Franz hospital
    2. Lebowakgomo hospital
    3. Mankweng hospital
    4. Pietersburg hospital
    5. Seshego hospital
    6. W F Knobel hospital
    7. Zebediela hospital
    8. Rethabile CHC
    9. Endermark clinic
    10. Seshego Zone 4 clinic
    11. Maggie’s Reproductive Health clinic – Private designated facility

    Greater Sekhukhune district
    1. Jane Furse hospital
    2. Matlala hospital
    3. Ikageng clinic
    4. Nchabeleng CHC

    Mopani district
    1. C N Phatudi hospital
    2. Letaba hospital
    3. Nkhensani hospital
    4. Sekororo hospital
    5. Duiwelskloof CHC
    6. Duiwelskloof clinic
    7. Mabins clinic
    8. Mariveni clinic
    9. Mashishimale clinic
    10. Mogapeng clinic
    11. Raphahlelo clinic
    12. Seloane clinic
    13. Shotong clinic

    Vhembe district
    1. Donald Fraser hospital
    2. Elim hospital
    3. Louis Trichardt hospital
    4. Malamulela hospital
    5. Siloam hospital
    6. Tshilidzini hospital
    7. Makhado CHC
    8. Tiyani CHC
    9. Tshilwabusiku CHC

    Waterberg district
    1. Ellisras hospital
    2. George Masebe hospital
    3. Witpoort hospital
    4. Voortrekker hospital
    5. Mookgopong CHC
    6. Thabaleshoba CHC

  • Immunisations
    IMMUNIZATION SAVES LIVES!

    It is estimated that about 1million children less than 5 years old, die globally every year. Most of these deaths can be prevented by immunization. Immunisation is a process whereby a vaccine (preparation made from the non-dangerous part of a germ) is given to an individual either through injection or orally in order to stimulate immunity (protection against a particular disease).

    • Immunity: Protection from an infectious disease. If you are immune to a disease, you can be exposed to it without becoming infected.
    • Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Vaccines are usually administered through needle injections, but can also be administered by mouth or sprayed into the nose.
    • EPI Aims to: control, eliminate and eventually eradicate Vaccine Preventable Diseases.
    • Control – The reduction of disease incidence, prevalence to a level that is locally acceptable as result of deliberate efforts. Continued intervention measures are necessary.
    • Elimination – Reduction to zero of a specific disease in a defined geographic area as a result of deliberate efforts. Continued intervention measures are required. E.g. Polio
    • Eradication – Reduction to zero worldwide of a diseases caused by a specific agent. Complete interruption of transmission & extinction of the causative agent, so it no longer exists in the environment. Intervention measures are no longer necessary. Example – Smallpox.

    Vaccines against a number of childhood illnesses are available at all Primary Health Care Clinics in the Province at no cost or free of charge. Every day is immunization day in all of the Province’s 469 facilities.

  • Health Promotion
  • Malaria Control Programme
    Introduction

    Limpopo is at the southern extreme of malaria distribution in Africa . Historically, the entire Limpopo was at risk of Malaria. Through targeted and sustainable Malaria Control interventions over a period of 65 years, malaria is now restricted to the eastern & northern low – lying areas of Mopani & Vhembe districts. These areas are prone to frequent explosive epidemics during the summer rainy season. Areas in southern Sekhukhune and western Waterberg are also prone to low – intensity focal outbreaks during the summer rainy season. Malaria is viewed as a priority disease in Limpopo, due to its potential to cause epidemics, with accompanying high morbidity and mortality. In order to control Malaria in Limpopo, the Department has the following strategic objectives :

    • To reduce and keep the incidence of malaria at the lowest practical level through indoor residual spraying.
    • To reduce the malaria case fatality rate to 0.5% by 2013.
    The major strategies used in the Malaria Control programme are:
    • To plan and implement preventative vector control measures, on the basis of malaria surveillance information (Intensive indoor residual spraying using both dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and pyrethroids).
    • To predict and detect epidemics early, in order to prevent and contain them.
    • To inform our communities through health promotion about the prevention of malaria and early treatment seeking behaviour.
    • Strengthen regional collaboration on malaria control.
    • The provision of early diagnosis and prompt treatment to malaria patients (case management and the treatment of uncomplicated malaria with artemisinin combination therapy [ACT]).

    Epidemiology of Malaria in Limpopo

    Malaria is endemic in the low – altitude areas of the northern and eastern parts of Limpopo along the border with Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Malaria transmission is distinctly seasonal, with transmission limited to the warm and rainy summer months (September to May) ; hence malaria is unstable and epidemic – prone. These seasonal epidemics are mostly as a result of favourable climatic conditions, including floods and droughts, which are conducive to mosquito breeding and parasite development. Increase in malaria drug resistance and movement of people between risk areas and control areas are also major contributing factors to increased malaria transmission. A major threat to the success of the Limpopo malaria control programme is the lack of control activities across our country borders in Zimbabwe & Mozambique.

    Over the past 12 Financial years, malaria cases have declined from around 10,000 per year, to less than 5,000 cases over the past three years. The malaria case fatality rate has remained at higher levels namely between 0.78 % in2001/02 and 1.68 % in 2003/04.

    All malaria cases are notified to the malaria control programme. Case information is entered into a database that is used for monitoring the malaria distribution in the province and evaluate malaria control operations. A definitive diagnosis, either through bloodsmear or through a rapid malaria diagnostic test is used at all levels of health care.

    Over the past 12 Financial years, malaria cases have declined from around 10,000 per year, to less than 5,000 cases over the past three years. The malaria case fatality rate has remained at higher levels namely between 0.78 % in 2001/02 and 1. 68 % in 200 3/04. All malaria cases are notified to the malaria control programme. Case information is entered into a database that is used for monitoring the malaria distribution in the province and evaluate malaria control operations . A definitive diagnosis, either through bloodsmear or through a rapid malaria diagnostic test is used at all levels of health care.

    Malaria Control Operations

    The main Malaria Control Intervention is the indoor residual spraying programme. This activity is carried out by malaria spra y teams, divided into geographical areas called sectors. The malaria control programme has 42 malaria teams that are responsible f or the spraying of more than 955 ,000 structures each year. The spraying of houses with residual insecticides has been very suc cessful in reducing the prevalence of the malaria vector mosquitoes. Risk areas to be included for indoor residual spraying are determined through entomological and epidemiological data. The indoor residual spraying programme in Limpopo is one of the most successful disease prevention programmes which are operational at community level . As all community members are at equal risk of contracting malaria, this intervention provides appropriate protection at this level. The Malaria control is Managed from the P rovincial Malaria Control unit, based in Tzaneen.

    Disease Management

    In order to reduce the development of severe and complicated malaria and to prevent malaria deaths, the timely identification and treatment of patients with malaria is critical. All the Primary Health Care facilities and Hospitals in Limpopo are equipped to diagnose malaria through a bloodtest and commence treatment. In line with National and International recommendation's , the first line treatment administered to all uncomplicated mal aria cases is an artemisinin based combination therapy [ACT] . Complicated malaria cases are all referred to a higher level of care for appropriate management. Systems are in place to monitor drug efficacy on an ongoing basis. A major challenge remains the delay of patients seeking health – care when infected with malaria. These delays result in the development of severe and complicated malaria which in turn may lead to malaria related deaths.

  • Allied Health Support Services
    Vision

    An optimal and sustainable allied health support services in Limpopo Province.

    Mission

    Provision and promotion of a comprehensive, accessible and affordable quality allied health support services according to professional standards to improve the life expectancy of the people of Limpopo.

    Programme purpose

    The purpose of the program is to render services required by the Department to realize its objectives of incorporating all aspects of Allied Health services. The disciplines within Allied Health are Optometry, Radiography, Physiotherapy, Occupational therapy, Medical Orthotics and Prosthetic services, Dietetics, Speech therapy and Audiology, Medical Social work and Laboratory services.

    For assistance please call the district coordinator in your district OR provincial co-coordinator.

    EARLY INTERVENTION IS MOST EFFECTIVE, SO DON’T DELAY!!!!!!!!!. VISIT YOUR ALLIED HEALTH SECTIONS TODAY!

    OPTOMETRY SERVICES

    Optometrists are primary health care specialists trained to examine the eyes to detect defects in vision, signs of injury, ocular diseases or abnormality. They are trained to examine, diagnose, treat, and manage some diseases and disorders of the eye and visual system. Optometrists are trained to examine the internal and external structure of the eyes to detect diseases such as glaucoma , retinal detachment , and cataracts .

    A detailed examination of the eye can reveal conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes. Optometrists make a health assessment, offer clinical advice and when necessary prescribe spectacles or contact lenses and low vision aids. In addition, optometrists can dispense, fit and supply spectacles or contact lenses and low vision aids.

    Areas of practice in Optometry

    There are many areas of practice in Optometry such as:

    Binocular vision

    Binocular vision: The ability to maintain visual focus on an object with both eyes, creating a single visual image. Lack of binocular vision is normal in infants. Adults without binocular vision experience distortions in depth perception and visual measurement of distance.

    Low vision

    Low vision is a reduced level of vision that cannot be fully corrected with conventional glasses. It is not the same as blindness. Unlike a person who is blind, a person with low vision has some useful sight. However, low vision usually interferes with the performance of daily activities, such as reading or driving. A person with low vision may not recognize images at a distance or be able to differentiate colours of similar tones.

    You are legally blind when your best corrected central acuity is less than 20/200 (perfect visual acuity is 20/20) in your better eye, or your side vision is narrowed to 20 degrees or less in your better eye. People who are legally blind may still have some useful vision. If you are legally blind, you may qualify for certain government benefits. It is estimated that approximately 17 percent of people over the age of 65 are either blind or have low vision.

    Clinical Optometry

    Clinical optometry defines the practice of diagnosing and treating disorders of the eye to improve vision in a clinic. During a clinical optometry examination, the optometrist measures the patient’s ability to see objects at various distances, along with the ability to see colour and light. An optometrist also looks for injury or disease that might be linked to declining eyesight. He or she typically measures pressure in the eye to detect glaucoma, a common disorder as people age, where too much fluid builds up in the eye. If left untreated, glaucoma could cause blindness.

    Clinical optometry includes observation for cataracts, a condition marked by clouded lenses. Cataracts might cause vision loss and is also related to aging. If this disorder is discovered, the optometrist commonly refers patients to an ophthalmologist for surgery to remove cataracts. An optometrist also refers patients to medical doctors and specialists for other diseases or injuries that affect vision.

    The optometrist is trained to diagnose and treat vision conditions such as:

    • Near-sightedness
    • Farsightedness
    • Astigmatism and Presbyopia.
    • In Limpopo Province only 37 hospitals are providing Optometry services. Provincial Coordinator: Ms Sathekge MJ Tel: 015 293 6100 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG 8 hospital Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Ms Segooa R.F Mokopane Tel: 015 483 4229 VHEMBE 7 hospitals Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Mr Niemand T Elim hospital Tel: 015 556 3201 CAPRICORN 8 Hospitals Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Ms Sathekge M.J Capricorn District Tel:015 290 9064 SEKHUKHUNE 7 Hospitals St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Ms Mohlala M.V St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI 7 hospitals Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Ms Mmaswakhomu MM Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 RADIOGRAPHY WHAT IS RADIOGRAPHY Radiography is the medical profession that produces images of internal body structures using ionizing radiation (x-rays). Radiography is used for both medical and industrial applications. If the object being examined is living, whether human or animal, it is regarded as medical; all other radiography is regarded as industrial radiographic work THE RADIOGRAPHER Health professionals working in radiography or x-ray department are referred to as radiographers and they facilitate patient diagnosis and management through the creation of medical images using X-rays, ultrasound and magnetic resonance. They play a pivotal role in selecting and implementing the most appropriate examination protocols which will answer the clinical question. THE RADIOGRAPH OR X-RAY FILM The creation of the familiar plain radiograph begins with the radiographer receiving a request form for a radiographic examination of a particular part of a patient’s body. The next phase involves the radiographer assessing the patient prior to selecting the most appropriate imaging equipment and positioning methods for the projections that will best answer the clinical query. Essentially the radiographic procedure involves the selection of exposure factors and the accurate positioning of the patient’s body in relation to the x-ray tube and the imaging device. RELATED IMAGING MODALITIES 1. Fluoroscopy Traditionally fluoroscopy is an imaging method that uses x-rays and closed circuit television to produce “real time” images of the body. The mobile versions of the fluoroscopic system are used extensively in the operating theatre to assist surgeons to evaluate a wide variety of operative procedures. 2. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY Computed tomography (CT) is an integral component of the general radiography department. Unlike conventional radiography, in CT the patient lies on a couch that moves through into the imaging gantry housing the x-ray tube and an array of specially designed “detectors”. Depending upon the system the gantry rotates for either one revolution around the patient or continuously in order for the detector array to record the intensity of the remnant x-ray beam. 3. ULTRASOUND Ultrasound imaging is another of the many ‘modalities’ that is encountered in the imaging department. Its distinctive feature is that it uses high frequency ultrasound to construct an image rather than the traditional x-ray. This means that it is a safe, non-invasive means of creating cross sectional images of the human body. It is also a relatively cost-effective means of imaging. 4. MAMMOGRAPHY Mammography uses dedicated, low-dose X-ray equipment, to obtain images of the breast to assist in the diagnosis of breast cancer and other breast diseases. 5. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OR MRI This is an advanced and specialised field of radiography and medical imaging. The equipment used is very precise, sensitive and at the forefront of clinical technology. 6. DIGITAL VASCULAR IMAGING This is an imaging modality that utilises the technology of digital fluoroscopy and additional equipment and computer systems to image the blood vessels (arteries and veins) of the human body. Provincial Coordinator: Maenetja LH Tel: 015 632 1800 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR RADIOGRAPHY COORDINATOR WATERBERG (8 hospitals) Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Nkuna C Mokopane Hospital Tel: 015 483 4000 VHEMBE (7 hospitals) Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Tshisimba O Tshilidzini hospital Tel: 015 964 1061 CAPRICORN ( 8 Hospitals) Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Maenetja LH Lebowakgomo Hospital Tel: 015 632 1800M SEKHUKHUNE ( 7 Hospitals) St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Makhari V St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI (7 hospitals) Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Lungenyi Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY What is Occupational Therapy? (OT) Occupational Therapy incorporates meaningful and purposeful occupation to enable people with limitations or impairments to participate in everyday life. Occupational therapists work with individuals, families, groups and populations to facilitate health and well-being through engagement or re-engagement in occupation. Occupational therapists are becoming increasingly involved in addressing the impact of social and environmental factors that contribute to exclusion and occupational deprivation. Areas of practice in occupational therapy There are many areas of practice in occupational therapy which have often been divided into Physical Health and Mental Health. Physical health Pediatrics – Schools, Community, inpatient hospital based child OT Acute care hospitals (Burns/Stroke/Hand Injuries/Spinal Cord Injuries/Head Injuries) Inpatient rehabilitation (e.g., Spinal Cord Injuries) Rehabilitation centers (e.g., TBI, Stroke (CVA), Spinal Cord Injuries, Head Injuries) Skilled nursing facilities Home Health Outpatient clinics (e.g., Hand Therapy, orthopaedics) Specialist assessment centres (e.g., Electronic assistive technology, Posture and Mobility services) Hospices Mental health Mental health inpatient units Adolescent, adult and older people’s acute mental health wards Adult and older people’s rehabilitation wards Prisons/secure units (Forensic psychiatry) Psychiatric intensive care unit Specialist units for Eating Disorders, Learning disabilities Community based mental health teams Child and adolescent mental health teams Adult and older people’s community mental health teams Rehabilitation and recovery and Assertive Outreach community teams Primary care services in GP practices Home treatment teams Early psychosis teams Specialist learning disability, eating disorder community services Day services Vocational Rehabilitation Services Community Community based practice involves working with people in their own environment rather than in a hospital setting. It can also involve working with atypical populations such as the homeless or at-risk populations. Examples of community-based practice settings: Health promotion and lifestyle change Intermediate care services Day centres Schools Child development centres People’s own homes, carrying out therapy and providing equipment and adaptations Workplaces Homeless Shelters Educational Settings Provincial Coordinator: Sekwaila RD Tel: 015 290 9146 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG( 8 hospitals) Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Segooa R.F Mokopane Tel: 015 483 4229 VHEMBE (7 hospitals) Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Niemand T Elim hospital Tel: 015 556 3201 CAPRICORN( 8 Hospitals) Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Ramakuela RF Mankweng hospital Tel: 015 286 1000 Sathekge M.J Capricorn District Tel:015 290 9064 SEKHUKHUNE( 7 Hospitals) St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Mohlala M.V St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI (7 hospitals) Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Mmaswakhomu MM Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY AND AUDIOLOGY. WHAT IS IT? Speech-Language Therapy and Audiology is a growing profession in South Africa with the purpose of helping people experiencing difficulties / problems in areas of talking, understanding, feeding and hearing. The professionals helping people with the above-mentioned problems are called Speech-Language Therapists and Audiologists. PROBLEMS WE TREAT SPEECH PROBLEMS: Articulation. This is the difficulty or inability to produce (say) certain sounds. Stuttering/Stammering. This is non-fluent speech. Voice (e.g. hoarse, breathy, abnormal high pitched voice, especially in males). Communication Neurological disorders (e.g. slurred speech, apraxia of speech). LANGUAGE PROBLEMS: Expressive language problems. This is when a person is unable to make his/her needs known (or to make him/herself understood). Receptive language problems. When a person has difficulties or problems understanding what is said to him/her. FEEDING DISORDERS: Difficulty or inability to move food from the mouth to the stomach ( e.g. sucking, chewing, biting and swallowing). The above-mentioned problems can be congenital (born with them) in nature or they can be acquired (happened during birth or any time in life e.g. from accidents, illnesses or age related). Both adults and children can have speech and/or language problems. COMMON CONDITIONS Syndromes (e.g. Down Syndrome) Cerebral Palsy Head Injuries Stroke Premature infants Swallowing Disorders Cleft Lip / Palate Head and neck cancers AUDIOLOGY This is about the study of the ear, hearing and balance problems. Like speech and language problems, ear and hearing problems can be congenital (born with them) or acquired. Both adults and children can have ear problems and experience hearing difficulties. The Audiologists test and treat people with ear, hearing and balance problems. COMMON CONDITIONS Wax plugs / foreign objects Ear infections / discharging ears Prematurity Hearing difficulties Balance disorders Chronic conditions e.g. HIV/AIDS, TB, Diabetes Syndromes Head and ear injuries Ringing or buzzing ears Head and neck cancers Speech-Language Therapists and Audiologists work together with a number of other professionals. They work closely with the Ear- Nose and Throat Specialist (ENT) to assess and treat ear, hearing, speech and feeding problems. As soon as a speech, language, feeding, hearing or balance problem is noticed, assessment should be done. Provincial Coordinator: Hlabangwane T Tel: 015 286 1000 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG( 8 hospitals) Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Segooa R.F Mokopane Tel: 015 483 4229 VHEMBE (7 hospitals) Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Niemand T Elim hospital Tel: 015 556 3201 CAPRICORN( 8 Hospitals) Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Ramakuela RF Mankweng hospital Tel: 015 286 1000 Sathekge M.J Capricorn District Tel:015 290 9064 SEKHUKHUNE(7 Hospitals) St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Mohlala M.V St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI (7 hospitals) Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Mmaswakhomu MM Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG ( 8 hospitals) Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Segooa R.F Mokopane Tel: 015 483 4229 VHEMBE (7 hospitals) Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Niemand T Elim hospital Tel: 015 556 3201 CAPRICORN 8 Hospitals Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Ramakuela RF Mankweng hospital Tel: 015 286 1000 Sathekge M.J Capricorn District Tel:015 290 9064 SEKHUKHUNE 7 Hospitals St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Mohlala M.V St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI 7 hospitals Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Mmaswakhomu MM Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 PHYSIOTHERAPY What is Physio? The scientific use of movement techniques based upon physiological principles, supplemented when necessary by massage, manipulation, electrotherapy and other physical and supportive measures and including advice to, and education of, the patient, for the prevention and treatment of injury, disease and disorders, and the facilitation of normal physiological processes and functional activities. These are used to assist rehabilitation and restoration of function, including the achievement of personal independence Physiotherapy is that part of health care that concerns itself with the: Assessment, treatment and prevention of human movement disorders, restoring normal function or minimizing dysfunction and pain in adults and children with physical impairment, to enable them to achieve the highest possible level of independence in their lives; preventing recurring injuries and disability in the workplace, at home, or during recreational activities and promoting community health for all age groups. Physiotherapists treat conditions such as: Backache Neck ache Muscular, ligament and tendon injuries or disease Nerve injuries or disease Hemiplegia Head injuries Spinal cord injuries Cerebral palsy Respiratory compromise due to either disease or injury Skin conditions or Injuries and others. The following are the fields covered by physiotherapists: (a) ORTHOPAEDICS In the whole field of orthopaedics, as requested by the medical practitioner. This includes fractures, dislocations, ligamentous and soft tissue lesions, joint deformities and diseases, infections of bone, including those of the spine, and their complications, amputations, specialised branches, e.g. hand surgery and tendon and muscle transplants. (b) NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSURGERY including participation by the physiotherapist in intensive care and rehabilitation. (c) RESPIRATORY DISEASES AND THORACIC SURGERY including inhalation therapy and participation by the physiotherapist in intensive care. (d) CARDIO-VASCULAR DISEASES AND SURGERY. (e) OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY including pre-operative and post- operative surgical conditions, antenatal and post-natal instruction, pelvic infections and other gynaecological conditions. (f) INTENSIVE CARE UNITS including coronary care, organ transplantation, dialysis, respiratory failure, tetanus, extensive paralysis, unconsciousness, accident services (multiple injuries) and burns. (g) REHABILITATION of the patient to his maximum potential both in work and sport, including adaptation to permanent disabilities. (h) SPORTS MEDICINE which includes prophylaxis and the treatment of all injuries and disabilities directly pertaining in sport. (i) PAEDIATRICS including all related fields, of medicine and surgery, including cerebral palsy; care of children with minimal brain dysfunction; developmental abnormalities; the prevention of orthopaedic and postural deformities. (j) GERIATRICS including the care of the aged in all related fields of medicine and surgery; prophylaxis; rehabilitation and activities. (k) TREATMENT of physical ailments of psychiatric patients; relaxation therapy; maintenance or restoration of physical fitness; organisation of remedial games, sports and recreational activities. (l) OTHER SURGICAL FIELDS including general, plastic, urological, maxillo-facial, ophthalmological, ear, nose and throat, and other surgical fields that may require physiotherapy services. (m) OTHER MEDICAL FIELDS including rheumatology, dermatology, ear, nose and throat fields, constitutional fields, Hansen’s disease, cancer and any other medical fields that may require physiotherapy services. (n) COMMUNITY CARE including prophylactic physiotherapy services, district and domiciliary services, day hospital organisations, rehabilitation centres including schools, industries and others. Where can you find the physiotherapy service in the Limpopo? We currently have services at all the 40 hospitals in the province. Provincial Coordinator: Phasha FG Tel: 015 290 9000 Ms Letsoalo Z.Z Mokopane Tel: 015 483 4000 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG 8 hospitals Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 VHEMBE 7 hospitals Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Tshilidzini Hospital Tel: 015 CAPRICORN 8 Hospitals Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Phasha FG Capricorn district Tel: 015 290 9000 SEKHUKHUNE 7 Hospitals St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Themedi R St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI 7 hospitals Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 DIETETICS What is a DIETICIAN? A dietician is a professional who is specifically trained to plan and provide adequate and appropriate nutrition intervention for all individuals. Nutrition is the foundation for human growth & development, continuing maintenance of health and well-being, recovery from diseases. What does a Dietician do? Assessment of individual nutritional status Plan adequate diet with regard to specific conditions. Educate and counsel individuals on healthy eating Monitoring and evaluation of prescribed diet Whom does a Dietician treat? A dietician plans special diets as part of medical treatment to clients with different conditions e.g.: Eating disorder Hypertension Diabetes Mellitus Cancer Cerebral Palsy Coma patients Poor appetite Pregnant and lactating women etc. HIV/AIDS Peptic ulcers Tuberculosis Kidney diseases Malnutrition Burns Constipation Hemorrhoids or piles Heartburn Cardiovascular failure Obesity and overweight Diarrhea & food allergies Provincial Coordinator: Motebejane TT Tel: 015 290 9000 DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG 8 hospitals Mokopane F.H Odendaal Voortrekker Warmbaths Ellisras Witpoort Thabazimbi George Masebe Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Mashabela L Mokopane Tel: 015 483 4229 VHEMBE 7 hospitals Tshilidzini Elim Donald Fraser Siloam Louis Trichardt Malamulele Musina Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Mugeri J Vhembe district Tel: 015 962 1001 CAPRICORN 8 Hospitals Pietersburg/ Mankweng hospital Lebowakgomo Seshego Knobbel Helena Franz Botlokwa Zebediela Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Motebejane TT Capricorn District Tel:015 290 9000 SEKHUKHUNE 7 Hospitals St Ritas Dilokong Jane Furse Mecklenberg Matlala Groblersdal Philadelphia Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Ramoroka KP St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI 7 hospitals Letaba Maphutha –Malatji Kgapane Nkhensani Sekororo C.N Phatudi Van Velden Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Sibanda M Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 MEDICAL ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS DISTRICT HOSPITAL ALLIED COORDINATOR COORDINATOR WATERBERG Mokopane hospital Mr Molokwane T Waterbburg district office Tel: 014 718 0600 Mabitje P Tel: 015 483 4000 VHEMBE Siloam hospital Mr Mugeri J Vhembe district office 015 962 1001 Beck RG Tel: 015 973 0004 CAPRICORN Pietersburg hospital Ms Mokoena LJ Capricorn district office Tel: 015 290 9000 Khaphathe D Tel: 015 287 5240 SEKHUKHUNE St Ritas hospital Ms Seloana T St Ritas Hospital Tel: 013 298 1000 Khuzwayo D. Tel: 013 298 1000 MOPANI Letaba hspital Ms Peniel L Letaba Tel: 015 303 8000 Nkuna V Tel: 015 303 8000